Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 3      Prev   1   2   3
Orange_Slime_

Registered:
Posts: 211
Reply with quote  #31 
First of all, I love the spread on size idea, along with surface shown based targeting instead of dead on magical cockpit shots,
so +1 for that,

BUT

If rifling in space caused drift, why have it? Why not just have a fastloading single barrel because you have space to cool it?
Maegil

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,436
Reply with quote  #32 
+1

Rifling was created to reduce drift by gyroscopic stabilization (make the ammo spin so fast that the defects influencing the centre of mass are negated, actually equalling the centre of volume). That it also made the rounds act as drills is just a nice side effect...

BUT![wink] Any drift form the guns in space would have to come from misalignments inherent to the weapon themselves (and a gatling has a lot of moving parts, and thus, of slack).
Orange_Slime_

Registered:
Posts: 211
Reply with quote  #33 
Why not a gatling setup where the rounds are loaded on top of eachother and are fired electronically, It's a neat way to add failure risk, and also can help with the damn perfect accuracy the guns have.
lostami

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 86
Reply with quote  #34 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Orange_Slime_
Why not just have a fastloading single barrel because you have space to cool it?

You are under the impression that space is cold and so it will cool things.

But in reality it is a nearly empty space with no matter inside it, heat is transferred via matter, heat passes from one form of matter to another. If you put a hot bar of iron into water, the heat moves from the hot metal into the cool water until a even temperature is reach between the metal and the water.

This is called convection, and with little to no matter in space, the heat has no where to go, it cannot simply drift into space as the nature of heat is actually the excitation of matter itself.

This was one of the key issues NASA had to overcome.

Orange_Slime_

Registered:
Posts: 211
Reply with quote  #35 
I'm not impressed as to that, I mean you have plenty of space to eject the heat sinked bullet casings.
Cy83r

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #36 
Tidbits: space is "cold" only because the very very very (veryveryveryveryvery) minute gas/dust traces (there is no such thing as perfect vacuum) are so spread out that calculating the amount of heat held by those very very very diffuse particulates compared to the actual volume of space results in a very low temperature

id est, a gas cools as it expands not because it loses heat, but because its volume/size increases but the energy remains constant or reduces due to thermal radiation

AND! the very very very inefficient cooling of thermal radiation, i.e. the heat wafting off of an object like a hot frying pan sitting out on the counter, is the only way something in a vacuum can cool- a hot frying pan on the counter would actually do most of its cooling through thermal conduction to the counter and, less efficiently, the atmosphere around it.  This is why some stoves have those wire-like grills over the heating element for you to rest your cook ware on- it's a kind-of-sort-of radiator/thermal chokepoint for the stove so you don't broil your cabinets alongside your eggs, it also holds cookware up and away from the gas flame. electronic stoves are different, their thermoplastic surfacing hiding the inscrutable mystery beneath- another example of a thermal conduction chokepoint in cookware would be those fancy frying pans that have part of their handle crimped into a really thin widge, it forces the heat to have to travel through the smaller volume of the chokepoint and even thermal conduction through a material can only happen so fast


More tidbits: casings don't have enough mass or time in the chamber despite their surface area to volume ratio to collect enough heat from the barrel/receiver to cool a weapon- regular machineguns have to change out their barrels every 300~1000 rounds or so of sustained fire- and by sustained I mean controlled bursts aimed at individual targets and groups, not reckless spray-and-pray

Great War Tidbits: a maxim gun would have better performance for its water-cooling sleeve around the barrel, which is kind of funny since multi-barrel designs were created to circumvent cooling-over-time issues from rapid fire in the first place, a gatt would have as many sleeves as it had barrels- if you want to hook that water-cooled gattling up to a coolant line to send heat into a radiator complex you'd need a heat interchange at the barrel rotation to conduct heat from a spinning to a static system, meaning less efficient that straight piping, but better than radiative cooling from the barrels alone- without a coolant line and big-old radiator on the backend those water-sleeves only serve as a temporary heat sink, once it maxes out you have to wait for all that heat to radiate anyways

Tidbits inSPAAACE: you'll never see pictures of the space shuttle with its bay doors closed unless about to return to earth's atmosphere because that open bay was the shuttle's radiator complex, if it closed then the whole spacecraft would start to heat up and make life support for the crew impossible- don't ask me what Apollo did for heat management, I haven't checked

Furthermore! if you were floating in open space without a suit, not only would you slowly decompress and vaporize fluids, GI tract, lungs, and exposed mucous membranes first (EXHALE & CLOSE YOUR EYES!), but the side of your body facing the sun would begin to heat and suffer severe sunburn while the side pointing away would slowly cool and possibly get chilly... eventually.  After a few hours, half of your body would need a burn ward and the other half some hot cocoa, by the time your shaded side froze at the surface you'd definitely be dead from sunbroiling if the asphyxiation didn't get you first- yikes!
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:


Create your own forum with Website Toolbox!